October 17, 2019

Living in Our Heads

Posted in Mindfulness, Well-being tagged , , , at 8:00 am by kellyfdennis

Mindfulness Meditation Workshop to Increase Awareness

clouds over propertySaturday, November 16, 9:00 am-10:30am; Counseling office: 304 N. George St., Millersville, PA 17551

The aim of mindfulness practice is to be more aware, more often. A powerful influence taking us away from being “fully present” in each moment is our automatic tendency to judge our experience as being not quite right in some way—that it is not what should be happening, not good enough, or not what we expected or wanted.

Mindfulness concepts and Meditation practices covered will include: Mindfulness of the breath and body, Mindfulness to “unhook” from thoughts, Sensory mindfulness, Mindful self-compassion.

Each session will be a combination of practice, lecture, and group discussion. Each session is taught in a supportive environment with no more than 8 people. This workshop is suitable for all levels of mindfulness meditation experience. Cost: $50

Kelly F. Dennis MS LPC is the facilitator. Pre-registration is required. Click here to register.  Or call Kelly (717)951-0266 (pre-payment is required).

 

July 16, 2019

Mindfulness Meditation to Reduce Stress

Posted in Compassion, Mindfulness, Well-being tagged , , , , , , at 11:49 am by kellyfdennis

landscape photography of white mountain*

Saturday, August 17, 2019 from 9:00 am-10:45 am. Location: Counseling office: 304 N. George St., Millersville, PA 17551

This workshop is designed to introduce and practice the concepts of mindfulness and mindfulness meditation strategies in a purposeful way in order to facilitate the integration of mindfulness into your daily life.

As Jon Kabat-Zinn says, “Mindfulness is awareness that arises through paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally. It’s about knowing what is on your mind.” As we learn to create intentional present moment awareness, we begin to see changes in our lives that reduce stress. We learn to relate to our difficulties in life with more openness, compassion, and acceptance.

Mindfulness Meditation practices will include: Attention and awareness, Mindfulness of breath and body, Sensory mindfulness, Mindful movement

Each session will be a combination of practice, lecture, and group discussion. Each session is taught in a supportive environment with no more than 8 people. This workshop is suitable for all levels of mindfulness meditation experience.

Cost: $50.00 Kelly F. Dennis MS LPC is the facilitator. Please contact Kelly to sign up or for further information: (717) 951-0266 or kelly@kellyfdennis.com

*Photo by Julius Silver on Pexels.com

May 15, 2019

Depression

Posted in cognitive behavioral therapy, Compassion, Mindfulness, Well-being tagged , , , , , , at 1:53 pm by kellyfdennis

man in blue and brown plaid dress shirt touching his hair*

Losing a loved one, getting fired from a job, going through a divorce, and other difficult situations can lead a person to feel sad, lonely,and scared. These feelings are normal reactions to life’s stressors. Most people feel low and sad at times. After a good cry or talking with a friend, we usually feel better.

However, in the case of individuals who are diagnosed with depression, the manifestations of the low mood are much more severe and they tend to persist. Crying does not help and talking with a friend is hard because one tends to feel alienated, because others can’t seem to understand why they can’t just “snap out of it.”

Major Depressive Disorder is a debilitating illness. Those suffering describe feelings of hopelessness, emptiness, despair, isolation and lonliness. One of the most difficult parts of treating depression is the negative cycle in which sufferers engage. Feelings of low self worth, negativity, and hopelessness beget more of the same thoughts and the cycle sends the person into despair.

Fortunately, when the individual learns to distance themselves from the cycle of negative thinking, he/she can begin to see a glimpse of light and hope. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mindfulness, and Meditation are awesome tools to help begin the process of distancing.

Check out my YouTube video for a Cognitive therapy-based mindfulness mediation designed to help you begin to learn the process of not engaging with every negative thought.

Be well and have a wonderful day!

*Photo by Nathan Cowley on Pexels.com

May 6, 2019

Mindfulness Meditation Workshop

Posted in Compassion, Mindfulness, Well-being tagged , , , , at 1:42 pm by kellyfdennis

Path thru woods

Saturday, June 22, 9:00 am-11:00 am

Counseling office: 304 N. George St., Millersville, PA 17551

This 2-hour workshop explores the concepts of mindfulness and mindfulness strategies in a purposeful way in order to facilitate the integration of mindfulness into your daily life.

“The range of what we think and do
Is limited by what we fail to notice
And because we fail to notice
There is little we can do
To change
Until we notice
How failing to notice
Shapes our thoughts and deeds.”
– R.D. Laing –

As we learn to create purposeful present moment awareness, we begin to see the changing of things in our lives that cause us stress. We learn to relate to our difficulties in life with more openness, compassion, and acceptance.

Mindfulness concepts and Meditation practices covered will include:  Mindfulness and the scientific research; Mindfulness of the breath and body; Obstacles to mindfulness; Sensory mindfulness; Mindful self-compassion

Each session will be a combination of practice, lecture, and group discussion. Each session is taught in a supportive environment with no more than 8 people. Cost: $75

Kelly F. Dennis MS LPC is the facilitator. Please contact Kelly to sign up or for further information: (717) 951-0266 or kelly@kellyfdennis.com

June 10, 2018

Managing PTSD Symptoms

Posted in cognitive behavioral therapy, Mindfulness, Post Traumatic Stress, Well-being tagged , , , , , at 8:05 am by kellyfdennis

adult air beautiful beauty

Photo by Oleksandr Pidvalnyi on Pexels.com

Practice relaxation methods

Try some different ways to relax, including:

  • Muscle relaxation exercises
  • Breathing exercises
  • Meditation
  • Swimming, stretching, yoga
  • Prayer
  • Listening to quiet music
  • Spending time in nature

While relaxation techniques can be helpful, in a few people they can sometimes increase distress at first. This can happen when you focus attention on disturbing physical sensations and you reduce contact with the outside world. Most often, continuing with relaxation in small amounts that you can handle will help reduce negative reactions. You may want to try mixing relaxation in with music, walking, or other activities.

Distract yourself with positive activities

Pleasant recreational or work activities help distract a person from his or her memories and reactions. For example, art has been a way for many trauma survivors to express their feelings in a positive, creative way. Pleasant activities can improve your mood, limit the harm caused by PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), and help you rebuild your life.

Talking to your doctor or a counselor about trauma and PTSD

Part of taking care of yourself means using the helping resources around you. If efforts at coping don’t seem to work, you may become fearful or depressed. If your PTSD symptoms don’t begin to go away or get worse over time, it is important to reach out and call a counselor who can help turn things around. Your family doctor can also refer you to a specialist who can treat PTSD. Talk to your doctor about your trauma and your PTSD symptoms. That way, he or she can take care of your health better.

Many with PTSD have found treatment with medicines to be helpful for some symptoms. By taking medicines, some survivors of trauma are able to improve their sleep, anxiety, irritability, and anger. It can also reduce urges to drink or use drugs. However, benzodiazepines are not recommended. (ptsd.va.gov)

May 25, 2018

Mental Health Awareness is a Good Thing!

Posted in Mindfulness, Self Image, Well-being tagged , , , , , at 8:19 am by kellyfdennis

backlit beach dawn dusk

Photo by Cedric Lim on Pexels.com

Yoga can improve mental health in general and may help relieve symptoms of mental health disorders like depression, anxiety, attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and schizophrenia.

Aside from its benefits for your mental health, it’s a great way to stretch and strengthen your muscles.

Mental Health America partnered with Annie Shiel, yoga instructor and co-founder of True U —an organization that empowers teens through yoga, true talk, and mindfulness—to show you two short yoga routines.

Go ahead and tell us about your yoga experience.

May 21, 2018

Mindful Mental Health Awareness

Posted in Mindfulness, Well-being tagged , , , , , at 8:10 am by kellyfdennis

balance-110850_640

Are you ready for another MindfulMonday? (Mental Health America)

Research indicates that people who practice mindfulness regularly experience benefits like reduced rumination (repeated thoughts about distress or problems without finding solutions), reduced stress levels, boosted working memory, increased focus, less emotional reactivity and more relationship satisfaction.

Guided meditations are a great way to practice mindfulness. The UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center have guided mindfulness meditations available in English and Spanish on their website at http://marc.ucla.edu/mindful-meditations. Or Check out one of Kelly’s on her You Tube Channel .

Feel free to share your experience being mindful!

February 7, 2018

Inner Critic

Posted in Mindfulness, Self Image tagged , , , , , at 4:49 pm by kellyfdennis

Kellysmile1The harsh internal critic was called the “pathological critic” by psychologist Eugene Sagan to describe the negative inner voice that we all possess.  I call her the “nasty girl that lives inside my head”.  Gender is a moot point, though, the pathological critic can take on either gender.  Therefore, your harsh internal voice may be a “nasty guy” if you are male. I’ll use female pronouns, but these principles apply to any “nasty” voice regardless of gender.

The thing about this nasty girl is that she thinks she’s being helpful. She seems to assume that if she beats me up enough, I will change my ways! That doesn’t usually happen, though. I tend to just feel crappy when she is saying nasty things to me. I have found it very  helpful to recognize when she’s “talking” and acknowledge her existence and what she’s “saying” by telling her, “Thank you, I hear that you think I’ll mess up that thing I’m working on, if I don’t try harder; but really, I’ve got this, thanks anyway.” Then I move on and shift my thinking. I  might have to do this several times in one hour depending on the situation!

Recognizing the difference between your own wise “voice” and the irrational nasty “voice” can be a little dificult at first. That “voice” has probably been in existence in your mind for a long time. Mindfulness can be very helpful in beginning to separate out what is the “wise” person “voice” and what is the “nasty” person “voice.” I have recently put up two videos on my You Tube channel that begin to teach the basics of mindfulness mediation. While they are not targeting the nasty and wise voices specifically, they do help you to get in touch with what’s happening in your mind and body and take you out of autpilot.

Don’t forget to subscribe to my channel to get access to all the content from past uploads as well as future uploads which will include a “Wise Voice” meditation.

Be Well and Have A Wonderful Day!

October 17, 2017

Loving Kindness

Posted in Compassion tagged at 9:26 am by kellyfdennis

Kelly

My meditation for this moment:

May you be safe.

May you be peaceful.

May you be healthy.

May you live with ease and well being.

May you be happy.

Pass it on!

stefdennis

ponderings on life, food, God, and love

Grace on the Moon

Do Not Weigh Your Self-Esteem on a Scale

on anything and everything

my thoughts on what I see